Donate Now

Article Posted • 05 May 2023

Saathi House begins collaboration with Brwn Girl in the Ring

Related News

We Are Amal
Stitching Stories: Rabia Choudhury
Quranic Illumination with Mahmud Manning

Photo:

Sophina Jagot

Saathi House begins collaboration with Brwn Girl in the Ring on collective poetry piece for Sight & Sound project

Women at Saathi House, Birmingham, have been taking part in the Amal-supported Sight & Sound project, which started in September 2023. Sight and Sound is designed to give local Muslim women in Aston confidence, opportunity, inspiration, and the ability to explore various art forms and create art. The first phase involved artists Haseebah Ali and Katie O’Sullivan who helped participants create Islamic Art with Graffiti canvases as well as a mural.  They then went on to work closely with artist Nilupa Yasmin to create mosaics and paper art.

The third and final phase will be led by Sophina Jagot, also known as Brwn Girl in the Ring. She is a storyteller and facilitator through poetry, fiction writing and theatre, based in the West Midlands. Her vision is to create work that centres and speaks to Brown, Black, Muslim and ethnically diverse women. Her hope is that her work transports you to a place of magical, hopeful, loving, honest and ultimately healing stories that don’t shy away from reality. Participants will work together to create a collective poem based on personal and community experiences.

Phase three begins on Wednesday 10 May from 9:30am – 11:30am at Saathi House, 49 Bevington Rd, Aston, Birmingham B6 6HR. If you are interested in taking part, please contact fateha@saathihouse.org.

Forming Part of

Amal’s Co-created Projects Programme

This project is part of Amal’s Co-created Projects programme.  We support high-quality arts projects that are co-created by Muslims and creative professionals and showcased within the wider community. These provide Muslims with opportunities they would not otherwise have to express their creativity in ways that matter to them.  By enabling experimentation between Muslim artists and communities, these projects model ways in which the UK’s arts and cultural mainstream could more fully and authentically represent and engage Muslims as individuals and communities.